Dutch pension fund kicks OCP over Western Sahara
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Morocco's state-owned phosphate company, responsible for the illegal exploitation of Western Sahara's phosphate reserves, was ditched over human rights issues in Western Sahara.
Published: 02.02 - 2016 12:05Printer version    
In April 2014, Morocco's state owned phosphate company, Office Chérifien des Phosphates (OCP), was allowed onto the Irish Stock Exchange, with an inaugural bond issue of 1.55 billion US dollars. Two coupons are available; a 10 year coupon at a rate of 5.625% and a 30 year coupon at 6.875%.

The Dutch pension fund for graphic designers PGB has excluded OCP from its portfolios in the fall of 2015, for "human rights violations in Western Sahara".

Ever since Morocco invaded Western Sahara in 1975, OCP took over the management of the territory's phosphate mines at Bou Craa. The UN Security Council's legal department concluded in 2002 that the exploitation and exploration of the mineral reserves of Western Sahara are a violation of international law if not undertaken in accordance with the benefits and the wishes of the Saharawi people - the rightful owners of the resources.

For years, Saharawis have been protesting against the illegal trade in phosphates mined in their occupied homeland. In recent months, an upsurge in protests could be witnessed in the occupied parts of Western Sahara, mainly targeted against OCP. Saharawis are frustrated that jobs created through the exploitation of their resources are overwhelmingly given to Moroccan settlers. They demand their right to employment, and - as banners at protests state -"fair share of our own wealth". The Moroccan regime deals with these protests as it deals with any form of dissent; with brutal force.

For decades, Morocco has sold off Western Sahara's highly lucrative phosphate rock as if it was entitled to do so. The revenues have been poured back into the costly occupation of Western Sahara.

OCP's affairs at the Irish Stock Exchange are managed by Barclays, Morgan Stanley and JP Morgan; multinational financial services corporations based in the UK and USA.

    

News archive:
21.06 - 2017Polisario warns shipping industry of more vessel detentions
20.06 - 2017Isle of Man shipping company exits Western Sahara until settlement
16.06 - 2017New report reveals the companies transporting conflict phosphate rock
15.06 - 2017Saharawis won first round in conflict mineral cargo court case
02.06 - 2017Moroccan government confirmed Glencore exit from Foum Ognit
29.05 - 2017Can the EU answer these questions on Western Sahara trade talks?
20.05 - 2017Canada bound ship with conflict minerals released from detention
18.05 - 2017Danish vessel with plunder cargo detained in Panama




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Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
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Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
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