Here is the "phosphate windmill park"
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There is little renewable in the operations of the Siemens run wind park in occupied Western Sahara. See the mills that supply the Moroccan illegal mining here, in partnership with the Moroccan king.
Published: 03.11 - 2016 10:40Printer version    
Western Sahara Resource Watch yesterday published the report “Powering the Plunder – What Morocco and Siemens are hiding at COP22, Marrakech", documenting how the alleged "sustainable energy" projects of Morocco and the German company Siemens in fact contribute to cementing the illegal occupation of Western Sahara. The project also creates increased profits on Morocco's illegal mining in the territory it occupies.

Former UN Legal Counsel, Hans Corell, yesterday told Danish media that such an operation is in violation of international law and basic business principles.

According to OCP, the Moroccan state-owned phosphate company which plunders the territory, 95% of the required energy is provided by windmills. These were built by German company Siemens, which refuses to answer questions as to whether it has sought the consent of the people of the territory. Siemens won the tender by partnering with a company of the Moroccan king.

Try entering these coordinates right into Google, and see the windmills for yourself. 27°01'34.0"N 13°22'48.7"W

The mills are located right next to the phosphate production plant it is supplying with energy. The photographs below show even how the OCP conveyor belt that transports the rock from the depleting mine inland out to the Atlantic Ocean, cuts right through the windmill park.

Morocco militarily invaded the territory of Western Sahara in 1975, forcing half the people to flee. Severe human rights violations are being committed against people who advocate for self-determination. Over 100 UN resolutions call for the Saharawi people's right to self-determination to be respected.

Images below are free of use. Find high resolution version by clicking on each image.

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News archive:
21.06 - 2017Polisario warns shipping industry of more vessel detentions
20.06 - 2017Isle of Man shipping company exits Western Sahara until settlement
16.06 - 2017New report reveals the companies transporting conflict phosphate rock
15.06 - 2017Saharawis won first round in conflict mineral cargo court case
02.06 - 2017Moroccan government confirmed Glencore exit from Foum Ognit
29.05 - 2017Can the EU answer these questions on Western Sahara trade talks?
20.05 - 2017Canada bound ship with conflict minerals released from detention
18.05 - 2017Danish vessel with plunder cargo detained in Panama




EN ES FR DE AR

Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
Stand up for the Gdeim Izik 25!

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Leading activists from Western Sahara are condemned to sentences ranging from 20 years to life imprisonment in connection to a mass protest in 2010 denouncing the Saharawi people’s social and economic marginalization in their occupied land; the Gdeim Izik protest camp.
Support Western Sahara Resource Watch

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Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
Report: Moroccan green energy used for plunder

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At COP22, beware of what you read about Morocco’s renewable energy efforts. An increasing part of the projects take place in the occupied territory of Western Sahara and is used for mineral plunder, new WSRW report documents.
The Western Sahara oil curse

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Big oil’s interest in occupied Western Sahara has taken a dramatic turn for the worse. Some companies are now drilling, in complete disregard of international law and the Saharawi people’s rights. Here’s what you need to know.

WSRW.org News Archive 2017
WSRW.org News Archive 2016
WSRW.org News Archive 2015
WSRW.org News Archive 2014
WSRW.org News Archive 2013
WSRW.org News Archive 2012
WSRW.org News Archive 2011
WSRW.org News Archive 2010
WSRW.org News Archive 2009
WSRW.org News Archive 2008
WSRW.org News Archive 2007
WSRW.org News Archive 2004-2006


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