Danish company stops salt imports from Western Sahara
salt_610.jpg

The exports of salt from Western Sahara to Denmark has now stopped. The Danish salt importer Dansk Vejsalt has declared that it will no longer be importing de-icing salt from the occupied territory.
Published: 09.02 - 2017 20:07Printer version    
In 2013, Western Sahara Resource Watch first wrote about a salt exporting business which had emerged in the occupied territories. The salt was to be exported to Europe where the product was to be used for de-icing of winter roads.

The Danish company Dansk Vejsalt has since that time been importing from the production site located in the occupied Western Sahara. It has probably been one of the larger importers of the product.

However, at a meeting with the Danish solidarity organisation Afrika Kontakt on 31 January 2017, the company declared it will carry out no further such imports.

The owner of Dansk Vejsalt, Stig Anthony, said that the company has stopped the imports from Western Sahara “because we don’t want any more trouble in regard to our de-icing salt.”

“This is an important victory for the people of Western Sahara. It means that the occupation of the colony becomes a little less profitable. But it is also a victory for Afrika Kontakt, as we have continuously exerted pressure on Dansk Vejsalt and their customers in Denmark,” says Jens Bruun Madsen from Afrikas Kontakt’s Western Sahara group.

Afrika Kontakt has been in contact with the importing company regarding the trade from Western Sahara since 2013.

In 2014, four Danish municipalities decided to scrap a contract to buy de-icing salt from Dansk Vejsalt after Afrika Kontakt had informed the municipalities that the salt was from Western Sahara and that the deal would be in violation of international law.

Other Danish municipalities choose to uphold similar deals, however, and supermarket chain Aldi continued to sell salt from Dansk Vejsalt in their supermarkets in Denmark.

Director of Dansk Vejsalt, Kim Løth, also informed Afrika Kontakt that the cooperation with Austin-based American company Crystal Mountain Sel Sahara had been terminated, according to Løth because Crystal Mountain Sel Sahara ships their salt from a habour in Western Sahara.

Dansk Vejsalt has previously bought their salt from the Crystal Mountain Sel Sahara, who mines salt from the Oum Dbaa mine just South of the Moroccan-Western Sahara border.

Dansk Vejsalt will be importing their salt from Tunisia in the future. Tunisia is a large exporter of such salts to Scandinavia. Also a Norwegian state importer told in 2014 it had rejected such imports due to matters of human rights.

The decision from Dansk Vejsalt comes after the Court of Justice of the European Union gave a verdict on 21 December 2016 that concluded that Western Sahara, is distinct and separate from Morocco, and that two free trade agreements between the EU and Morocco therefore do not apply to Western Sahara.

Trade with products from Western Sahara is also in violation of international law, unless the indigenous people of that territory benefit and agree to the trade, something that the Saharawis of Western Sahara have not.

As the representative in Denmark of Western Sahara’s liberation movement Polisario (who the UN recognise as the legitimate representatives of the Saharawis), Abba Malainin has stated, “the Saharawis have never okayed the salt mining and selling of salt in Western Sahara”.

Western Sahara has been colonised by Morocco for 40 years, since the Spanish left the territory in 1975.

    

Top
News:

20.03 - 2017 / 20.03 - 2017French government dilutes Court of Justice conclusion
17.03 - 2017 / 17.03 - 2017Spain confirms: EU-Morocco trade deal not for Western Sahara goods
17.03 - 2017 / 02.03 - 2017New controversial energy infrastructure to be built in Western Sahara
16.03 - 2017 / 16.03 - 2017New publication on the EU and Western Sahara
10.03 - 2017 / 08.03 - 2017Morocco lobbies for toxic metals in EU agriculture
08.03 - 2017 / 05.03 - 2017Basque parliament asks companies to stay clear from Western Sahara
03.03 - 2017 / 02.03 - 2017The Vigeo Eiris shock: from ethics to occupation
15.02 - 2017 / 15.02 - 2017Glencore steps up oil search offshore occupied Western Sahara
13.02 - 2017 / 12.02 - 2017Siemens dodges questions on Saharawi consent
10.02 - 2017 / 09.02 - 2017This cargo from occupied Western Sahara is now to arrive France
09.02 - 2017 / 09.02 - 2017Danish company stops salt imports from Western Sahara
02.02 - 2017 / 02.02 - 2017EU looks to avoid energy imports from Western Sahara
25.01 - 2017 / 25.01 - 2017Key Bay unloaded all cargo in Fécamp, France
24.01 - 2017 / 24.01 - 2017Here is the Key Bay inside the port of Fécamp
23.01 - 2017 / 23.01 - 2017Why the Key Bay imports are not in accordance with EU law
22.01 - 2017 / 22.01 - 2017Key Bay just outside of port of Fécamp
18.01 - 2017 / 18.01 - 2017Key Bay to arrive in France while complaints to be filed
14.01 - 2017 / 14.01 - 2017Key Bay appears at Las Palmas horizon
14.01 - 2017 / 13.01 - 2017Key Bay is now heading to Las Palmas
07.01 - 2017 / 07.01 - 2017Fresh images: Key Bay inside the port




EN ES FR DE AR

Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
Report: COP22 controversy - Moroccan green energy used for plunder

tn_poweringplunder_eng_610.jpg

At COP22, beware of what you read about Morocco’s renewable energy efforts. An increasing part of the projects take place in the occupied territory of Western Sahara and is used for mineral plunder, new WSRW report documents.
Support Western Sahara Resource Watch

tn_sjovik_demo_610.jpg

Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
The Western Sahara oil curse

tn_san_leon_protest_camps_8_august_2015_610x200.jpg

Big oil’s interest in occupied Western Sahara has taken a dramatic turn for the worse. Some companies are now drilling, in complete disregard of international law and the Saharawi people’s rights. Here’s what you need to know.
Stand up for the Gdeim Izik 25!

tn_court_photo_gdeim_izik_610.jpg

On 17 February 2013, in a mockery of justice, a Moroccan military court condemned 25 Saharawi citizens to shockingly tough prison sentences. Help us to release the Gdeim Izik 25.

WSRW.org News Archive 2016
WSRW.org News Archive 2015
WSRW.org News Archive 2014
WSRW.org News Archive 2013
WSRW.org News Archive 2012
WSRW.org News Archive 2011
WSRW.org News Archive 2010
WSRW.org News Archive 2009
WSRW.org News Archive 2008
WSRW.org News Archive 2007
WSRW.org News Archive 2004-2006


Register for our English newsletter:









These web pages have been built with the financial support of the trade union Industry Energy