Ballance Agri-Nutrients admits to be buyer of seized cargo
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The company which hardly ever responds to concerns over their imports of conflict phosphates from occupied Western Sahara has now started talking.
Published: 04.05 - 2017 10:17Printer version    
The New Zealand fertiliser producer Ballance Agri-Nutrients has admitted to media in the country that the cargo which has been detained in South Africa this week is for them.

CEO Mark Wynne told Radio NZ on 4 May that the single shipment constituted a quarter of its annual imports for the year. He said his gut feeling is that the issue of the detained vessel will not be resolved immediately, but that it might take a number of weeks.

WSRW contacted Ballance Agri-Nutrients in 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and never received answer to our questions from the company.

In 2015, as New Zealand TV did a piece on the imports, Ballance refused to comment. Instead, shortly after the New Zealand media coverage, Ballance posted an update to its shareholders.

New report on global phosphate trade from occupied Western Sahara
ic_india_610.jpgOver 200 million dollars worth of phosphate rock was shipped out of occupied Western Sahara last year, a new report from WSRW shows. New Zealand is second biggest importer, report uncovers.
In it, the company stated that it had "received advice that OCP’s operations in Western Sahara meet the requirements of international law, in particular the relevant Resolutions of the Security Council and the General Assembly of the United Nations that the trade in resources is done in a manner consistent with the needs, interests and wishes of the local people."

The statement is peculiar:
  • Neither the Security Council nor the General Assembly have passed resolutions on trade with resources from Western Sahara in particular. What the General Assembly has done, however, is to generally pass resolutions on the plunder of colonies, and it has asked Morocco to terminate the occupation.
  • Ballance has not provided information about the authors of the advice of OCP's operation. The WSRW report P for Plunder 2016 mentions a Saharawi refugee who has contacted OCP 19 times to get copies of these opinions that is allegedly showing that her people benefit and wish the trade to take place. She never got an answer.
  • Ballance claims to operate in line with the wishes of the local people. However, Ballance systematically refuses to answer questions on what it has done to seek that consent. The issue of consent of the representatives of the people is the corner stone of the judgment of the Court of Justice of the EU in 21 December 2016, which stopped the inclusion of Western Sahara goods in the EU-Morocco trade deals. All WSRW's letters on this topic remain unanswered.

    In Ballance's annual report from 2007, the company states to be "extremely proud" of the relationship with OCP. Institutional shareholders, pension funds and sovereign wealth funds from all over the world have blacklisted OCP and other importers for not respecting basic international law.

    "Morocco is our largest supplier", Mr Wynne told Radio NZ today. It is not clear to WSRW whether this is correct. From what WSRW understands, Ballance does not get any phosphates from Morocco itself Mr. Wynne also states "it is possible" to get the phosphates from somewhere else, under certain preconditions.

    Mr. Wynne is referred to by Stuff.nz as having stated that it had imported more than 100 shipments "without a problem".

    "If it has only communicated only with the occupying power, of course Ballance sees no problem. Through decades of imports, Ballance has been one of the biggest funders in the world of the Moroccan illegal occupation of the territory. Leading opposition to the trade are serving life-time in jail, while the owners are malourished from not receiving enough humanitarian aid. Is that not a problem? Why does Ballance refuse to talk with the owners of the phosphates?", stated Erik Hagen of Western Sahara Resource Watch.


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    11.04 - 2017 / 31.03 - 2017Agrium looks to other sources than Western Sahara
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    Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
    Stand up for the Gdeim Izik 25!

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    On 17 February 2013, in a mockery of justice, a Moroccan military court condemned 25 Saharawi citizens to shockingly tough prison sentences. Help us to release the Gdeim Izik 25.
    Support Western Sahara Resource Watch

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    Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
    Report: Moroccan green energy used for plunder

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    At COP22, beware of what you read about Morocco’s renewable energy efforts. An increasing part of the projects take place in the occupied territory of Western Sahara and is used for mineral plunder, new WSRW report documents.
    The Western Sahara oil curse

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    Big oil’s interest in occupied Western Sahara has taken a dramatic turn for the worse. Some companies are now drilling, in complete disregard of international law and the Saharawi people’s rights. Here’s what you need to know.

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