Fish discarded even on land in occupied Western Sahara
Article image
When the vessels come in with too much fish to El Aaiun harbour, the surplus is trown away at a waste dump nearby. New and fresh images show tonnes of fish dumped onshore.
Published 19 November 2013


Western Sahara Resource Watch earlier today revealed disturbing images of 60 tonnes of sardines dumped in the sea by the vessel Adrar earlier this year. From what WSRW has been told, that was just one of many cases where Adrar has discarded perfectly edible fish.

WSRW has also received images of discards dumped on land, at the waste dump called El Carian, near the harbour, not too far from Western Sahara's capital city El Aaiun. The images below were taken on that waste dump on 14 November 2013.

From what WSRW understands, the dumping of fish onshore is done so that the fishermen do not surpass their allotted quotas. After being dumped, it is said that the fish is picked up again and transported to the Moroccan town of TanTan, where it is used for some sort of agricultural fertiliser purpose, although that has not been confirmed.

Morocco is currently occupying most of the territory of Western Sahara. Through the fishing industry, Morocco manages to settle many of their own population in the territory, thus hampering a solution to the conflict. The International court of justice has rejected Morocco's claims to the land. Half the Western Sahara people live as refugee, in refugee camps where, in periods, one in five children suffer from severe malnutrition.

Click on images for high resolution. Free use.

el_carian1_609.jpg

el_carian2_609.jpg

el_carian3_609.jpg

el_carian4_609.jpg

el_carian5_609.jpg

el_carian6_609.jpg

el_carian7_609.jpg

el_carian8_609.jpg

el_carian9_609.jpg

el_carian10_609.jpg

el_carian11_609.jpg

el_carian12_609.jpg

el_carian13_609.jpg

el_carian14_609.jpg






Trawler in occupied Western Sahara involved in massive discards

Yet again, a fishing vessel managed by a Moroccan ex-general is dumping tonnes of fish in occupied Western Sahara. New video reveals the environmental mismanagement.

07 May 2016

Morocco continues to discard by-catches in occupied Western Sahara

WSRW has received images of fish being dumped in the desert near the town of Dakhla to hide over-fishing. The pictures were taken two days ago.
22 October 2015

Moroccan government accused of fraud with EU anti-driftnet money

Morocco received 4 million € from the European Union to put a stop to the harmful use of driftnets. Morocco's Trade Union of Traditional and Coastal Fishermen claims that the entire sum was given to two individuals lacking any legal status to receive the money, and has taken the matter to court.
26 June 2015

Sharks still under threat in occupied Western Sahara

Pictures taken in Boujdour harbour, occupied Western Sahara, demonstrate that vulnerable shark species are still being caught by the Moroccan fleet in the territory - in spite of international rules and regulations calling for their protection.
30 April 2014