Trump backs occupation, opens consulate in Western Sahara

US president Donald Trump issued a statement today in which he backs Morocco's occupation of Western Sahara and the opening of a consulate in Dakhla, "to promote economic and business opportunities".

10 December 20

Outgoing US President Donald Trump on 10 December, on Human Rights Day, recognised Morocco's untenable claim to occupied Western Sahara, in return for Morocco normalising relations with Israel. Find the proclamation here.

The statement also stipulates that "the United States will encourage economic and social development with Morocco, including in the Western Sahara territory, and to that end will open a consulate in the Western Sahara territory, in Dakhla, to promote economic and business opportunities for the region."

The town of Dakhla is the location where a US bitoin mining company will establish a large energy project next year. Some agriculture products are allegedly also exported from the unsustainable greenhouses in the desert near Dakhla to North America.

"It is not for Donald Trump to decide the status of Western Sahara. International law has determined that this is the prerogative of the people of Western Sahara", says Sylvia Valentin, Chair of WSRW. "US recognition of Morocco's illegal occupation of Western Sahara does not make the occupation legal."

In response to the US move, the spokesperson of UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres noted in a press briefing today that "Our stand on Western Sahara is unchanged".

The move marks a departure from longstanding US policy, which did not formally recognise Morocco's claim to the territory.

The US Trade Representative stated for instance in 2004 that the US-Morocco Free Trade Agreement does not include Western Sahara, since "The United States [...] do not recognize Moroccan sovereignty over Western Sahara

Sneak peek on ENGIE's position

For a little while, ENGIE had published on its website hints about who it had actually "consulted" when doing business in occupied Western Sahara.

10 December 20

HeidelbergCement takes side in the conflict

The German building materials giant sides with Morocco in the Western Sahara conflict, avoiding any questions on its own legal obligations in the occupied territory.

10 December 20

Telecom cables laid in occupied waters

The French company Alcatel Submarine Networks SpA, partially owned by Nokia, has laid telecom cables in occupied Western Sahara. 

10 December 20

Report reveals clients of Western Sahara’s conflict mineral

India and New Zealand stand out as the main importers of phosphate rock from occupied Western Sahara, in WSRW’s newest annual report on the controversial trade. 

10 December 20