News
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When it arrived New Zealand, they claimed Predator came from Jorf Lasfar in Morocco. It really came form El Aaiun in occupied Western Sahara.

Published 13 December 2007
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One of the most important importers of phosphates from occupied Western Sahara is located in New Zealand. Check out their factory here.
Published 10 December 2007
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Norwegian insurance company, Kommunal Landspensjonskasse Mutual Insurance Company (KLP) has blacklisted Wesfarmers on account of its trade with Morocco in phosphate pillaged from Western Sahara. Read press release from the Australian Western Sahara Association, 4 December 2007.

Published 04 December 2007
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Morocco is entering new oil contracts with European firms to illegally search for oil in Western Sahara.

Published 28 November 2007

WESTERN Sahara will conduct its second licensing round in Houston early next year, writes Barry Morgan.

Published 21 November 2007
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According to the New Zealand Minister of Trade, 90% of all phosphate rock used for super phosphate manufacture in New Zealand is from Western Sahara.

Published 19 November 2007

A HEBRIDEAN fishing crew is heading for Morocco because they claim they are unable to catch enough fish in their home waters.

Published 18 November 2007
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As far as we know it is the first collective work published in English dealing with the legal aspects of the Western Sahara problem.

Published 18 November 2007
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Members of parliament protesting in front of Incitec Pivot offices, importer of phosphate from occupied Western Sahara.

Published 24 September 2007
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"Morocco has no right to exploit the natural resources in Western Sahara for its own benefit", said Swedish MFA Carl Bildt in Swedish parliament this week.

Published 24 September 2007
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Wednesday afternoon, the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign affairs publicized on their webpages an announcement that they discourage Norwegian businesses from operating in Western Sahara. The statement was made at the same time as another Norwegian vessel was discovered transporting phosphates to New Zealand. See Norwatch films of the Norwegian phosphate exports, taken in New Zealand Wednesday.
Published 18 September 2007

Norwegian-Japanese owned company Gearbulk transports phosphates from occupied Western Sahara to New Zealand. Check out the Norwatch video in this article, documenting the illegal exports.

Published 18 September 2007
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Gearbulk, a company partially owned by the Jebsen family, ships phosphates from Western Sahara on behalf of the Moroccan occupying authorities. Norwatch can reveal that a Jebsen vessel docks Tuesday in a harbour in New Zealand. This trade is contradictory to discouragement from the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Published 18 September 2007
Norwegian diplomats want bulkers to stop loading phosphate in Western Sahara but their jawbones are their only weapon.
Published 18 September 2007

Members of parliaments in Great Britain, Japan, New Zealand and at home in Norway are not at all happy with shipowning firm Gearbulk. Aftenposten, 29 June 2007.

Published 18 September 2007
Short overview of Spanish enterprises with relations to Western Sahara, as of September 2007.
Published 16 September 2007
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A visiting journalist from Western Sahara today appealed for support from New Zealand to block trade supporting the military occupation of his country by Morocco. Pacific Media Centre, New Zealand, 23 July 2007.

Published 10 September 2007
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Europapress: NGOs supporting Western Sahara accuse the firm FMC Foret of plundering 500.000 tonnes of phosphates yearly.
Published 18 September 2007
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Once more, it is revealed that the Norwegian owned but UK- based company Gearbulk is assisting the Moroccan occupying power in exporting phosphates from Western Sahara. One of their bulk transport vessels arrives New Zealand on September 9th. -This is war profiteering, says the Association of Sahrawis in Norway in a press release today.

Published 18 September 2007
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It\'s a fair bet that few New Zealanders will ever have heard of Western Sahara or the Saharawi people who inhabit this territory. We have no obvious connection to the area and the most we could say is that from its name we\'d expect to find it on the west coast of North Africa.
Published 18 September 2007